Dominican Spanish Slang

Dominican Republic Spanish slang book cover

Learning Dominican Spanish
One Word at a Time

Dictionary Plus Words and Phrases

No matter whether traveling to the Dominican Republic as a tourist, a student, or with the intention of moving there as an expatriate, this guide will serve you well. You probably already know the Spanish spoken by Dominicanos is a distinct and unique idiom, rich with words, phrases, and slang they don't teach in high school Spanish class.

Intended for English speakers, this book's shares common slang words and phrases that will help you communicate in everyday situations like ordering dinner in a restaurant, shopping at the mercado for fresh produce, flirting at a club, getting street directions, or hiring a taxi. That said, be advised this little book is neither a complete course in learning the Spanish Language, neither is it a textbook. Instead of a scholarly work, this basic introduction to Dominican Republic Spanish is a good beginners guide you can handily carry on your travels either in your back pocket or tucked away in a backpack. Even if you studied Spanish in high school, learning a few words of Dominican specific slang will pay big dividends by way of more enjoyable conversation. And even more importantly, help you fit in a little better.

The Dominican Republic is gorgeous from its tropical beaches and mountains to its teeming metropolis Santo Domingo. The food is delightful. The people are friendly, relaxed and easy going. There’s lots to do, lots to enjoy. SCUBA, snorkeling on the reefs, zip-lining and relaxing on the beautiful beaches.

Before you go, consider taking the time to learn a few words and phrases so you can speak street Spanish like a local.

This guide contains a wealth of words and expressions that you can look up when you hear, or read them, in order to know what is going on around you. Even better, spend a night or two curled up with the book gaining familiarity with the wisdom it contains. That way, when you hear a vaguely familiar word on the street, you will know which page to consult to refresh your memory.

On the streets (las calles), in the shops (las tiendas), on the beaches (las playas), in the clubs (las discotecas) and at the grocery store (el supermercado), knowing at least some street talk will pay big dividends. Instead of being seen as some soul-less gringo tourist, the locals will hold you in higher esteem. As a result you may make new friends, and as a bonus perhaps get a better price on hotel room or lower prices while shopping.

A Sampling of Dominican Republic Foods


Ahuyama - A yam used in many soups for nutrition and color

Ají A generic pepper

Aji Verde - Green pepper

Albóndigas - meatballs

Alcachofas - artichokes

Algarrobo - A very strange, fruzzy textured fruit. When opened it reeks, hence its nickname mierda en cajeta (shit in a little box) texture. Once you get past the foul odor, the fruit is sweet and delicious.

Arbejas - peas

Arenque - stewed herring

Arepa a spicy, baked pudding made from cornmeal and coconut

Arepitas de Maíz - fried corn meal cakes that resemble corn bread

Bacalaítos - codfish fritters

Bacalao - cod fish

Barbacoa - barbecue

Batata Frita - sweet potato fritters

Batata - sweet potato

Batida - a drink blended with fruit, ice, sugar and either regular or Carnation milk

Berenjena - eggplant

Biscocho cake or biscuit

Bistec a thinly-sliced beefsteak

Bondelic - prune cake

Cajuilitos Sulimanes - a small, red, pear-shaped fruit, boasting amild flavor and crunchy texture

No matter whether traveling to the Dominican Republic as a tourist, or with the intention of moving there as an expatriate, this guide will serve you well. Intended for English speakers, this book's Spanish/English dictionary shares common slang words and phrases that will help you communicate in everyday situations like ordering dinner in a restaurant, shopping at the mercado for fresh produce, flirting, getting street directions, or hiring a taxi.

That said, be advised this little book is neither a complete course in learning the Spanish Language nor is it a textbook. Instead it is an introduction to Domican Spanish.

Suffice it to say, this is a good pocket beginners guide you handily can carry on your travels in your back pocket or backpack. Finally, we have used a large font to make the text eminently more readable.


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Middle Coast Foreign Language Series

Trade Paperback: 52 pages
Language: English/Dominican Republic Spanish
ISBN 978-0934523-52-3
Dimensions: 6 x 9 inches
Shipping Weight: 4.5 ounces

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